Beretta Launches Spring 2018 Pistol Promotions

By: Guy J. Sagi


Purchase a Beretta Nano pistol between March 1 and April 30, and you could qualify to receive a $75 Visa prepaid debit card. Pick up one of the company’s APX handguns during the same period, and you can claim five free magazines—a $165 value.

Eligible guns in the Nano offer include all configurations purchased new at a retail outlet and paid for in full between March 1-April 30, 2018. Rebates are limited to one per gun.

Featuring a smooth, snag-free design and stainless-steel magazines, Nano models are available in Flat Dark Earth, Sniper Grey, Rosa and Robin’s Egg Blue. The three-dot sights are adjustable, it comes with flush and extended magazines and feature a striker deactivator button.

The offer is only available to individuals and certain restrictions apply. Purchasers of a Nano should receive a promotion code from the retailer and be prepared to submit it along with a dated sales receipt (complete with the firearm’s serial number) and/or a copy of the completed 4473. Visit the deal’s website for full details and applicable limitations.

Eligible guns in the APX pistol promotion must be purchased and paid for in full between March 1 and April 30.  The offer is limited to five APX magazines per handgun purchased and does not include any that are considered used, closed-out or discounted.

The APX was designed specifically for military and law enforcement operators and features replaceable grip frame housings and a removable, serialized chassis frame. The striker-fired gun, available in 9 mm and .40 S&W, utilizes full-length slide serrations to ensure easy manipulation under any conditions.

Magazines eligible for the promotion include all 17-, 15- and 10-round models. The 21-round versions are excluded.

The offer is limited to individuals only, and a retailer-provided promotion code is also required as well as sales receipt (with serial number) and/or copy of the 4473. Full details are available on the web page.


First Look: Remington Golden Saber Black Belt Ammo

By: Evan Brune


Remington expanded its self-defense ammo offerings in 2018 with the company’s all-new Golden Saber Black Belt ammunition. This new load incorporates a novel bullet design that optimizes several components of the round’s ballistic performance, including jacket retention and barrier penetration.

“Historically, Remington brought Golden Saber P&R out to provide superior performance to our competitors at the time,” said David Schluckebier, new product development manager for Remington. “The next evolution in Remington’s premium P&R (pistol & revolver) collection came with the Golden Saber Bonded line. The Golden Saber Black Belt brings the best features and benefits of the previous lines to it, providing best-in-class performance.”

The new round was tailor-made for law-enforcement use, and Remington has submitted the all-new Black Belt load in a bid to win the FBI’s latest ammo-contract solicitation. However, all of the elements that make it a suitable law-enforcement load also provide excellent performance for personal defense.

The bullet features a spiral nosecut, which ensures expansion even at low velocities. The benefit of this particular design element is that users will see adequate expansion when using the rounds in short-barrel personal-defense guns that don’t provide the muzzle velocities of larger, duty-size firearms.

Of course, one of the stand-out elements of the new Remington Golden Saber Black Belt cartridge is the black belt surrounding the middle of the round. After experimenting with plastic belts that didn’t meet performance needs, the company finally settled on a brass band with a black-oxide finish.

“The belt is the key to the superior performance,” Schluckebier said. “The belt is there to displace the jacket toward the center axis of the bullet. It was a way to provide a mechanical core-locking feature more pronounced than the initial driving band we put on the Golden Saber. The existence of the band has a dual purpose as well. It will undoubtedly stop the petal tear at that location.”

With the addition of the black belt surrounding the bullet, the overall design follows more of an hourglass-shape that differs from traditional bullet designs. Remington engineers developed this unique jacket to provide consistent performance, regardless of barriers.

“Specifically, the shape of the formed jacket allows for bonded performance in the harder barriers while providing normal Golden Saber performance in the softer ones,” Schluckebier said. “So, we are getting both expansion and weight retention more consistently across barriers, which makes the bullet performance more barrier-blind. In other words, the most important performance result—penetration distance—becomes more consistent, barrier to barrier, shot to shot.

Shown on the graphic is the cross-section of the Remington Golden Saber Black Belt bullet, which illustrates how the brass band forms part of the bearing surface on the projectile.

What does this mean for home-defense and personal-protection use? Schluckebier said that the round’s consistent performance across all barriers means there’s less chance of over-penetration, thanks to the round’s aggressive expansion. This reduces the chance that exiting rounds will continue to travel through traditional barriers found in urban environments, like drywall, floorboards, doors and more.

In addition to the projectile’s unique design, other elements of the ammo are purpose-built for daily carry and consistent performance. The cartridge case is nickel-plated to reduce the chances of corrosion and enhance lubricity for reliable function. Additionally, the bright nickel also makes it easy to visually see that a firearm is loaded with a brief press check, even in low-light conditions.

Other stand-out components include a waterproof seal around the neck of the case and the inside of the primer pocket, preventing moisture from compromising performance. The round also uses flash-suppressed propellant and an optimized primer that work to reduce muzzle flash that can disorient users in low-light self-defense scenarios.

Remington Golden Saber Black Belt ammunition is available in 124-grain 9 mm, 124-grain 9 mm +P, 180-grain .40 S&W and 230-grain .45 ACP loads. The suggested retail price per box of 20 rounds starts at $24.29.

First Look: Crimson Trace SIG Sauer P320 Laserguard

By: SI Staff


Crimson Trace’s line of handgun Laserguard laser sights saw an expansion in early 2018, bringing a number of new fits to the company’s collection. One of the latest offerings is the all-new Crimson Trace SIG Sauer P320 Laserguard, designed for use on the commercial P320, M17 and M18 handguns.

Two models of the Laserguard are sized to fit the P320, one with a red laser and the other with a green laser. Each laser-aiming module clamps securely onto the Picatinny accessory rail located on the underside of the pistol frame. Combined with this anchor point is a section of the Laserguard specifically molded to the contour of the P320 handgun’s trigger guard, clamping onto the gun and providing an especially secure mount. One element to note is that the P320 Laserguard model will fit every P320 grip frame except for sub-compact options.

Underneath the trigger guard is the company’s trademarked Instinctive Activation pressure pad, which automatically activates the laser once a secure firing grip is obtained. Each Laserguard model is equipped with a master on/off switch that enables users to control whether or not the laser is automatically activated by the activation pad located on the front strap of the grip. Additionally, windage and elevation adjustments are also provided, allowing users to customize their laser sight’s zero to fit their personal-defense needs.

Each Crimson Trace Laserguard sight is built with a durable polymer housing, and the sides of the P320-specific Laserguard model have a number of angled striations designed to match the serrations found on the slide of the P320. The instinctive-activation pad is constructed from overmolded rubber designed to withstand the daily wear and tear of concealed carry. Each unit is powered by a single 1/3N lithium battery or two 357 silver-oxide batteries, and the P320 Laserguard sight is covered by Crimson Trace’s Free Batteries for Life program. Battery life on this laser lasts for slightly more than two hours.

The Crimson Trace SIG Sauer P320 Laserguard ships with a factory zero of 50 feet, providing a 0.5-inch aiming dot at that distance. The suggested retail price on the LG-420 red Laserguard model starts at $229, while the green-laser model retails at a suggested price of $309.


New for 2018: Walther Arms PPS M2 RMSc

Fans of the Walther Arms concealed-carry handguns can now take advantage of a new carry optics package offered by the company in the form of the new PPS M2 RMSc. This new-for-2018 package combines the compact size and enhanced ergonomics of the PPS M2 pistol with the rapid target acquisition provided by the Shield Sights RMSc reflex sight.

“Carry optics is a fast growing category, and Walther is very excited to offer the PPS M2 equipped with the RMSc,” said Kevin Wilkerson, marketing manager for Fort Smith-based Walther Arms. “The combination provides significant value with a slim factory milled slide topped with an exceptional optic. This pairing will be a perfect fit for the buyer looking for a concealable optic ready product.”

One of the difficulties of pairing a red-dot reflex sight with the PPS M2 was dealing with the thin slide on the gun, which measures just an inch wide. Luckily, Shield Sights took its popular RMS reflex mini sight and shrank the design in order to allow it to fit onto compact, single-stack carry guns like the Glock G43, Smith & Wesson M&P Shield and now the Walther Arms PPS M2. The sight provides users with a bright, clear aiming dot that measures 4 MOA in diameter.

The rear of the slide on the Walther PPS M2 RMSc is milled to accept the reflex sight and allows the red dot to sit low enough in the slide that the dot can co-witness with the iron sights on the gun. Should the reflex sight ever run out of power or be damaged, users can still accurately fire the handgun using the irons. Should owners want to remove the red-dot optic entirely, a cover plate is included to fill the milled gap in the slide.

The suggested retail price on the Walther Arms PPS M2 RMSc package is $699, which is a significant savings for consumers versus purchasing each component separately. The suggested retail price on the PPS M2 alone is $469, while a standalone Shield RMSc reflex optic has a suggested retail price of $504.


10 New Guns to See at the Great American Outdoor Show

By:  Adam Heggenstaller


While SHOT Show may be the first place dealers, industry insiders and vetted media types get their hands on the year’s new guns, “regular” hunters and shooters who are not part of those groups miss out. Fortunately the Great American Outdoor Show, which follows on the heels of SHOT, gives consumers their chance to see new firearms (and optics, ammo and other gear) from dozens of the same manufacturers who made big introductions just weeks before.

With more than 1,100 exhibitors filling 650,000 square feet of floor space at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg during Feb. 3-11, it can be difficult to know where to start. So let us help you plan your visit. Here are 10 new guns on display at Great American that you’ll want to check out. We’ve even put them in order by booth location, starting near the entrance to the Shooting Sports Hall in the Cameron Street lobby and working across the aisles from right to left.

1. Midland Backpack—Booth 281 (Navy Arms)
Here’s something you don’t see every day: A single-shot shotgun that folds in half for easy transport, weighs less than 5 pounds and retails for less than $150. The Midland Backpack is available in 12-gauge, 20-gauge and .410-bore with an 18.5-, 24- or 26-inch barrel. Its synthetic buttstock accepts spacers for length-of-pull adjustments, as well as holds a survival kit (sold separately). Barrels are interchangeable, and Midland expects to offer rimfire and centerfire rifle versions soon.

2. Shaw Custom Rifles Mk. X—Booth 217
Shaw builds rifles based on the customer’s choice of barrel, chambering and stock, and this year the company offers a new action as an option as well. The Mk. X centerfire action features a hybrid push-feed/controlled-round-feed bolt, detachable box magazine, integral recoil lug and scope bases, and a honed Savage AccuTrigger. Customers get their pick of right-hand or left-hand actions in blued chrome-moly or stainless steel, two barrel contours in several lengths and more than 80 chamberings. A Timney trigger is also available as an upgrade. Shaw currently offers the Mk. X with a grade 5 walnut stock, but more options are planned for the future.

3. Hi-Point 1095TS Carbine—Booth 301
The 10mm Auto cartridge is a favorite among hunters who use a semi-automatic pistol for deer and hogs, and it provides even more velocity and performance when fired from a carbine. The semi-auto 1095TS carbine has a 17.5-inch barrel, weighs 7 pounds and feeds from a 10-round detachable box magazine. It features fully adjustable rear peep and post front sights, Weaver accessory rails and a polymer stock. Like all Hi-Point carbines, the 1095TS represents a value; it retails for less than $390.

4. Marlin Model 1895 Trapper—Booth 363 (Remington Outdoor Company)
Long-range precision shooting may be all the rage, but we’re willing to bet more deer are killed each year at 60 yards in the brush than at 600 yards in the wide open. For the thick stuff, Marlin gives us the Trapper. This new variation of the classic Marlin 1895 has a fast-handling 16.5-inch barrel chambered in .45-70, a big-loop lever and a Skinner peep sight. The extended magazine tube holds five rounds, yet the rifle’s overall length is just 35 inches.

5. DPMS GII Compact Hunter—Booth 363 (Remington Outdoor Company)
Looking for one AR to hunt predators and deer, but don’t trust the .223 Rem. for big game? Check out the GII Compact Hunter, which is now chambered in .243 Win. The GII is a scaled-down version of the typical large-receiver (think .308 Win.) AR. Its minimal dimensions, 16-inch barrel and carbon-fiber fore-end cut weight to just 7 pounds. Other factors that contribute to comfort in the field include a B5 Systems SOPMOD buttstock and a Hogue OverMolded rubber grip.

6. Taurus Raging Hunter—Booth 473
Despite its “Raging” name, we think the new six-shot .44 Mag. revolver from Taurus will make a lot of hunters happy. Its 8 3/8-inch barrel is surrounded by an aluminum shroud that helps reduce weight and provides a Picatinny rail for mounting optics. Ports in the barrel, along with a grip that has a cushioned insert, help reduce recoil and muzzle flip. The Raging Hunter has a fully adjustable rear sight and a fixed front sight.

7. Smith & Wesson Performance Center Model S&W500—Booth 481
OK, so the Smith & Wesson X-frame revolver in .500 S&W Mag. isn’t new. However, this version—which has a tuned Performance Center action, an unfluted cylinder and a 3.5-inch barrel with a Hi Viz fiber-optic front sight—is, and do you really need an excuse to heft one of the world’s most powerful revolvers? This may be the ultimate big-bear defense gun.

8. SIG Sauer ASP20—Booth 589
Just last spring Pennsylvania approved .177- and .22-caliber air rifles for hunting small game and furbearers, making SIG Sauer’s introduction of the ASP20 particularly well timed. Noteworthy features of the break-barrel, gas-piston ASP20 include a two-stage, user-adjustable MatchLite trigger; GlideLite cocking mechanism that requires just 33 pounds of force to cock; wedge-type breech-locking system that eliminates barrel droop; and integral sound dampener. The .177-caliber ASP20 produces a muzzle velocity of 1021 fps with an 8.64-grain pellet for 20 ft.-lbs. of energy, while the .22-caliber rifle drives a 14.65-grain pellet to 841 fps at the muzzle for 23 ft.-lbs. of energy. Both versions are available with a full-size wood or synthetic stock.

9. Mossberg Patriot Synthetic Cerakote—Booth 663
At less than $450, the new Patriot Synthetic Cerakote could be the best value in all-weather rifles we’ve seen. Mossberg treats its flagship Patriot barreled action with Cerakote—a corrosion- and wear-resistant ceramic coating—and then secures it in a durable polymer stock. Other features include a four-round detachable box magazine, user-adjustable LBA trigger and 22-inch fluted barrel. Mossberg offers the rifle in .243 Win., 6.5 Creedmoor, 7mm-08 Rem., .308 Win., .270 Win. and .30-06 Sprg.

10. Henry Big Boy Color Case Hardened Rifles and Carbines—Booth 647
Really nice lever guns are timeless, which is why Henry adds six color-case-hardened rifles and carbines to its Big Boy family this year. Chamberings include .38 Spl./.357 Mag., .44 Spl./.44 Mag. and .45 Colt. Rifles have a 20-inch octagonal barrel, 10-round capacity and standard-loop lever, while carbines have a 16.5-inch octagonal barrel, seven-round capacity and large-loop lever. All wear American walnut stocks that beautifully complement the striking case colors on the steel receivers and fore-end caps.



Smith & Wesson Introduces M&P380 Shield EZ Pistol

By: American Rifleman Staff


In the past when a pistol manufacturer touted a new gun entry as having easy slide manipulation—even with a .380-cal.—we have taken the assertion with a grain of salt until we’ve had some hands-on experience. In the case of the just-announced Smith & Wesson M&P380 Shield EZ, we can attest that indeed, the pistol lives up to its claims.

American Rifleman editors had some early range time last fall with the new .380 ACP addition to the very popular M&P Series, and have been eagerly awaiting its announcement. We’ll be putting the pistol through our regular test and evaluation protocol in the coming weeks, but here’s what we can tell you in terms of features:

The pistol, which offers an 8+1 round capacity, ships with two 8-round magazines that include a load-assist button, as well as a Picatinny-style rail for accessories. Barrel length is 3.675”, and the pistol is outfitted with white-dot front and adjustable white-dot rear sights. Along with tapped rear slide serrations, a one-piece single-action trigger and audible trigger reset, it also features an 18-degree grip angle for a natural point of aim, as well as enhanced, textured grips. A tactile loaded-chamber indicator, a reversible magazine release, and available ambidextrous thumb safety round out its many ergonomically friendly features. The pistol will be available nationwide at the end of Feb. 2018 at an MSRP of $399.

“When we set out to design the M&P380 Shield EZ pistol, our goal was to deliver an all-around, easy to use personal protection pistol—from loading and carrying, to shooting and cleaning,” said Jan Mladek, General Manager of M&P and S&W Brands.  “… We focused on key areas that customers told us were important—the ease of racking the slide and loading the magazine,” he said, “allowing consumers of all statures and strengths the opportunity to own, comfortably practice with, and effectively utilize this exciting new pistol“ for both first-time shooters and experienced handgunners alike.

Check back in the coming weeks for a complete evaluation of the new M&P380 EZ. For more, visit


Browning Ends Hi-Power Handgun Production

By: Guy J. Sagi


In February 2018, Browning announced its Hi-Power pistols are no longer in production. “Current dealer inventories will be the last available from Browning for the foreseeable future,” the website explains. Supply is scarce, however, because availability to dealers ended sometime in 2017. New Mark IIIs or Standards are easiest to find because they were the last models to come out of the factory.

John Moses Browning’s 1911 handgun design and its subsequent 100 years of popularity cast a long and unearned shadow over his subsequent Hi-Power work. When Browning was commissioned by Belgium’s FN to create a new military sidearm, the design required an all new approach because he’d sold the 1911 patents to Colt. In 1925, he’d completed the work, and a year later he was dead—making this his last gun design. U.S. patent inspectors approved it in 1927, but FN relied on the expertise of Dieudonné Saive to improve on the locked-breech recoil version. He’s credited with completing the project, rightfully so, and the final product included his staggered-cartridge magazine that provided double the capacity of contemporary handguns—a lucky 13.

The single action wasn’t without faults, though. In 1928, patents for the Colt Model 1911 expired and some of its features were integrated into the Hi-Power, including the barrel bushing. It was officially adopted by the Belgian military in 1935.

The pistol was battle-tough and fielded by the Allies during World War II. It also came into the hands of Axis forces after the FN factory was taken over by Germany. Canada, in turn, started to produce the pistols to keep supply lines filled during the conflict. It was fielded by the British airborne, the SAS and even the OSS, the forerunner of the modern-day CIA. Some of the firearm’s variants are still being used in the global war on terrorism.

Subsequent modifications to some variants included ambidextrous safety, spurred hammer and double-action versions. A 9 mm chambering is most common, but it was also made in .40 S&W.

There’s no shortage of modern aftermarket parts or modifications, either. Shooting Illustrated’sRichard Mann walked readers through the changes he made to his Hi-Power and why he finally added one to his collection in 2015.

Some sources claim more than a million have been made. The odds are good the figure is greatly higher than that, considering the number of genuine versions that’ve come out of the FN factory and clones from different countries.

At press time, there was no word if the Belgium manufacturer is still producing the classic handgun. We do know, however, U.S. enthusiasts are going to have a harder time than ever finding one.


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Check out new website! And Clearance Section.


New for 2018: Remington TAC-14 Hardwood

By: Kevin Creighton


Remington’s TAC-14 firearm is a popular way to tie up a lot of firepower into a compact little package. While it may look like a short-barreled shotgun, it is, in fact, considered to be a “firearm” under current NFA regulations.

For SHOT Show 2018, Remington has taken the TAC-14 firearm and updated with a look that hearkens back to the classic “Witness Protection” sawed-off shotguns used by Federal Marshal Service agents to provide them with the punch of 12-gauge shotgun in an easy-to-carry size.

The short-barreled Witness Protection shotguns were a staple of firearms media in the ’80s and ’90s, and they also appeared in the hands of actors playing Federal Marshals in movies like “Eraser” and TV shows such as “Justified,” giving it a place in firearms lore that goes beyond most shotguns and makes it an iconic firearm that symbolizes a certain time and place in gun history.

The Remington TAC-14 Hardwood combines the ease of purchase of the TAC-14 firearm with the classic good looks of the Witness Protection shotguns to produce a gun that looks great and is easy to wield in tight confined spaces. The TAC-14 Hardwood is a 12-gauge firearm that has a 14-inch, cylinder-bore barrel and has a 5+1 magazine capacity. The gun has a sling swivel in the front and rear and comes with a nylon sling for easy carry. In all other aspects, it’s essentially identical to the original TAC-14 firearm that it’s based upon.

The TAC-14 firearm is slightly longer than it’s short-barreled shotgun predecessor, but other than that, it looks and feels like the classic shotgun of the Marshal’s service, and with an MSRP of $499, you can get the trusted firepower of a government agent without having to take out a government loan to get one.


SHOT Show 2018: Century Arms Draco NAK9 AK Pistol

By: B. Gil Hillman


Century Arms is expanding its Draco line of compact AK-pattern pistols to include the new NAK9 chambered in 9 mm. The company has wisely designed the magazine well to accept factory and after-market magazines designed for Glock G17 and G19 pistols in capacities ranging from 15 to 33 rounds.

Manufactured in Romania, this blowback-operated pistol features a stamped receiver, hardwood fore-end furniture, a black polymer grip and an 11.14″ barrel. The mil-standard 14×1 mm threading of the muzzle accepts various muzzle devices and sound suppressors. The controls follow typical AK standards with a right-side mounted safety selector, steel bow trigger and lever-style magazine release. The pistol ships with AK-style adjustable iron sights and a Picatinny rail for optics.

The NAK9 has an overall length of 19.1″, an unloaded weight of 6.38 lbs. and ships with one 33-round magazine. A sling mount is attached to the rear of the receiver to accommodate single-point slings. The pistol will have a suggested retail price of $724.99