First Look: Ed Brown LS10 1911 Pistol

By: SI Staff

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Fans of the 10 mm cartridge have had to look far and wide for a long-slide 1911-style gun chambered in the powerful cartridge. Now, with the introduction of the Ed Brown LS10 long-slide 10 mm 1911, shooters looking for an accurate pistol in the powerhouse chambering can cease their search.
The Ed Brown LS10 is designed from the ground up for long-range target shooting and hunting with a long-slide handgun that incorporates a 6-inch barrel, perfect for taking advantage of the enhanced performance characteristics of the 10 mm round. In addition to the increased velocity offered by the lengthened barrel, the longer slide also provides shooters with an increased sight radius, ensuring more accurate shooting.
To take advantage of this tack-driving accuracy, the pistol can be had with an adjustable rear sight. For those looking to take advantage of more modern micro red-dot sights, Ed Brown will also sell a model that features a milled slide that comes filled with a Trijicon RMR reflex optic, ensuring that shooters can get on target quickly and easily with a 3.25-MOA red dot.
When equipped with an RMR, the Ed Brown LS10 will also feature back-up iron sights from Trijicon. These tall irons are designed for nighttime and low-light use and have enough clearance to allow shooters to use the optics through the window of the RMR optic.
The LS10 1911 measures 9.75 inches in overall length, with a height of 6.25 inches. The total weight of the gun, including an empty magazine, is 43 ounces. The slide and frame are constructed from stainless steel, and the gun is finished in Ed Brown’s black Gen4 finish. The total magazine capacity of the pistol is nine rounds.
The pistol also features 25 lines-per-inch checkering on the front strap and mainspring housing of the frame, ensuring that shooters have a firm gripping surface on the pistol that withstands the recoil of the powerful 10 mm round. The slide features traditional forward-facing cocking serrations located on the rear of the slide. The pistol also includes a French border, serrated slide top and a flush-fit barrel.

By: SI Staff

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Heckler & Koch is providing consumers with an extra incentive to pick up new handguns from the company with the launch of its 2017 “Summer Magazinepalooza.”

The promotion, which launched on July 1, provides H&K pistol buyers with four free handgun magazines from the company, an estimated value of $200, with the purchase of a brand-new full-size P30 or VP Series handgun.

“We are excited to offer the first time ever Summer Magazinepalooza to show our appreciation and provide a valuable incentive to our customers this summer,” said Mike Holley, H&K vice president of sales and marketing.

The event covers every eligible handgun purchased from July 1 to Sept. 30, 2017, and H&K will allow rebate offers to be sent in on qualifying purchases until Oct. 31, 2017.

Handgun models that are eligible for the promotion include the P30, P30L, P30S, P30LS, VP9, VP9 Tactical, VP40 and VP40 Tactical. The promotion does not include the HK P30SK series or the VP9SK pistols.

To enter the promotion, consumers must provide the model and caliber of the handgun they purchased, along with the part number and serial number of the gun. The customer’s name and physical mailing address must be provided, along with a valid email and the name of the dealer where the gun was purchased.

A proof-of-purchase receipt must also be scanned and included. The company accepts .jpg and .pdf files, which can be uploaded directly to the rebate website. After all of the information is processed, customers will receive four free magazines in 8-10 weeks.

The H&K VP9 is the first striker-fired pistol produced by the company since the 1980s and builds on much of the knowledge gained by engineers in the process of developing the company’s hammer-fired P30 pistols. The VP9 is built to provide a consistent, high-quality trigger pull. Both the P30 and the VP9 have an ergonomic grip design that provides interchangeable panels in order to mold the grip to a shooter’s particular hand shape.

Crimson Trace Launches Glock Laserguard Pro Models

By: SI Staff

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Crimson Trace announced the addition of green and red Laserguard Pro models to fit full-size, compact and subcompact Glock pistols, allowing owners to incorporate both laser sighting and illumination capabilities to their handgun.

The Crimson Trace Laserguard Pro, introduced in 2015, provides users with a red or a green laser that’s adjustable for windage and elevation. The Pro also includes a 150-lumen LED white light for target illumination and identification in low-light conditions.

The new models of the Crimson Trace Laserguard Pro are designed to attach to the trigger guards of Glock pistols. To accommodate the different trigger-guard dimensions, the company launched several different models. The LL-807 Laserguard model is designed to fit the following Gen3 and Gen4 Glock models: G17, G19, G22, G23, G31, G32, G34, G35, G37 and G38.

Other models of Glock pistols feature longer trigger guards and must use the LL-810 Laserguard Pro model. These pistols include the Gen3 G26, G27, G29, G30, G33, G36 and the Gen4 G26, G27, G29, G30 and G33.

Crimson Trace also has Laserguard Pro models to fit Gen3 G26, G27, G29, G30, G33 and G36 pistols. For the company’s Gen4 lineup, options are available for the G26, G27, G29, G30 and G33.

With every Laserguard Pro model, the company includes installation screws and a battery for operation. The unit is covered under Crimson Trace’s Free Batteries for Life program. The suggested retail price on the Crimson Trace Laserguard Pro starts at $279.

Ruger LCP II Pistol

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by Dick Jones

The new Ruger LCP II is an excellent .380 ACP pistol that’s easily concealed, has some great features and is a solid shooter.

When I was a young man working behind a gun counter, the choices of truly small pistols were severely limited, and none were more than marginally effective. The smallest were the .22 short and .25 ACP semi-autos that offered less muzzle energy than many air rifles currently available. When one was purchased and the buyer was walking out the door, there was always a remark about the value of chocolate grips, or perhaps filing off the front sight in the event someone made the owner eat it or ingest it into some other orifice. There were Remington-pattern two-shot derringers available, but they were single action, heavy and antiquated. High Standard made a little double-action over/under .22 Magnum, and it was the best tiny gun to be found but offered only two shots and was still pretty heavy because it was all steel.

To get a small semi-auto in a more powerful caliber, one had to go to guns the size of the Walther PPK that Mr. Bond made famous, and a PPK is not a tiny gun by the standards of today. The PPK and other guns of a similar size were available in .32 and .380 ACP, and ammunition was full metal jacket only. I think James Bond was the only guy who saw the PPK as an effective stopper. There’s a new reality with modern defensive .380 ammunition; it’s now more effective than the standard round-nosed lead 158-grain load that 90 percent of law enforcement officers carried just a few years ago, and because of this, I consider a .380 a viable concealed carry gun when you simply can’t hide a bigger gun.

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In the process of writing The Gun Digest Book of Concealed Carry Handguns, I reviewed the three most popular .380 sub-compact semi-auto concealed carry pistols. The guns I chose for the test were the Ruger LCP, the S&W Bodyguard and the Glock 42. While all were similar as sub-compact .380s, the three guns revealed a noticeable difference in approach to the same issue. The LCP was certainly the smallest and lightest, but with tiny sights and a challenging trigger. The Bodyguard was a bit larger, still with a long stroke trigger, but was a full featured semi-auto with a slide that locked back on the last round and sights that were more usable at a slight cost in concealability. The Glock was simply a sized-down version of the standard Glock product with all the features of any other Glock, smaller, but hardly a miniscule pistol. As a result, the Glock was easy to shoot, the Ruger was easy to hide and I chose the Bodyguard because it had slide lock and second strike capability.

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A Great Gun…But
As I say almost every time I review a gun, we’re currently blessed with some mighty good choices in firearms, and it’s really hard to improve on what we have. Having said this, the LCP II is a big improvement over an already excellent concealed carry pistol. First impression is that it’s a bit bigger, but it’s just barely bigger than the original. When you operate it, you notice the big improvement, the trigger. The trigger on the older version was a long, double-action-type pull. The gun was already small, and guys with average-sized hands had trouble getting a full stroke before the index finger buried itself into their thumb. In spite of the long compression, the LCP didn’t have second-strike capability, meaning a second pull of the trigger wouldn’t fire the striker in the event of a dud round.

Another shortcoming of the earlier design was the lack of slide lock on the last round. There’s no doubt this omission was to allow lighter weight and simplicity, but it’s a nice feature to have, and most of us who shoot autoloaders have grown accustomed to the slide locking back. Still, the LCP was a very good gun, and at just over 9 ounces with a thin profile and shape, it was an easy gun to hide almost anywhere. Ruger sold tons of them, and it took a lot of LCPs to make a ton.

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Striker-Fired Trigger in a Hammer Gun
The new gun corrects every shortcoming of the original. First is the trigger. It’s an excellent striker-fired-style trigger. The LCP II isn’t a striker-fired gun. It still has a hammer, but the trigger pull duplicates the bladed, two-stage trigger of a good striker-fired service gun. My test gun’s trigger broke at a reasonable 6 pounds. Light triggers aren’t a good idea on defensive guns in the hands of shooters who aren’t highly trained, and 6 pounds is reasonable. The first stage is light; the second stage is well defined, and while there is backlash, it isn’t excessive.

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The next improvement is slide lock on the last round. The original LCP had a manual slide lock, and though it was a bit difficult for anyone with sausage fingers, it was functional. The LCP II locks the slide back on the last round, decreasing the time required for a reload by what would seem eons if it was required during a deadly force event. Fortunately, reloads for civilians in defensive situations are almost non-existent, but it’s still a great feature.

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The third major improvement was in the sights. On the original model, the sights looked like they might have been an afterthought. They were tiny, but in good light, they worked well enough to produce silver dollar sized groups at 7 yards. The sights on the LCP II are substantially larger, though still smaller than the almost-full-sized sights on a Glock 42. These three improvements cover every area of concern I’ve heard about the original LCP and at a cost of about 1 ounce of weight and $90.00. The MSRP of $349.00 is very competitive in the sub-compact pistol market. Still, Ruger is betting the $259.00 price, and slightly lighter weight, merits keeping the original LCP in the catalog.

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Range Impressions
Shooting the LCP II was much easier than the original and also easier than my previous favorite, the S&W Bodyguard. The two-stage trigger is easy to manage, and the sights are large enough to see. The grip is small, but a small gun can’t have a large grip. I fired it with both the flat magazine plate and the one with the finger hook. With the finger hook, it’s a two-finger arrangement. Without it, I could only get about half my ring finger on the grip. Grip texture is lightly stippled. One thing I noticed from the outset was the slide seemed easier to operate. On the original LCP, there was a separate stage at the beginning of the slide’s stroke. On the LCP II test gun, the slide stroke was smooth all the way back. This is not a big issue for most, but of real importance for those with low hand strength, like some women and older shooters.

There is recoil. Even a .22 that weighs 10 ounces will generate recoil, and a firm grip is required to keep it properly placed in the hand when shooting fast. Still, it’s capable of shooting ragged-hole groups at 7 yards, and that’s all you can ask of a gun this small. The Ruger-LCP-II-target-288x300sights were easy to see, but I think a three-dot system might make it a bit better in low light. I teach shooting to a lot of novice shooters and lining up three dots is an easy way to teach sight alignment to a former non-shooter. The LCP II is a gun that’ll be attractive to those new to the concept of daily, concealed carry. There were zero malfunctions with the three rounds tested.

The magazine release is easy enough to get to, especially for a small gun, and the LCP II doesn’t just release the magazine, it launches it. I particularly liked the fact that I can drop a magazine without it snagging on the heel of my hand, a common problem with many smaller pistols. The gun comes with only one magazine, and I’d have liked to have another to see just how fast I could accomplish a mag change with it. I suspect it would be about as fast as any compact pistol and faster than some.

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The Fix Is In
In closing, the LCP II is everything one can ask for from a super tiny, reasonably powerful, decently accurate, easy-to-hide defensive pistol. Were I to revisit that test of the Glock 42 and S&W Bodyguard against the new LCP, the result would be different. The LCP II would be the clear winner because it has the best features of the other guns combined with substantially less size and weight. It’s certainly a good choice and maybe the best choice in the sub-compact pistol market.

Specifications:

Ruger LCP II
Type: Semi-auto, internal hammer-fired
Caliber: .380 ACP
Barrel: 2.75 in., alloy steel
Overall Length: 5.17 in.
Weight: 10.6 oz.
Grips: Integral with polymer frame
Sights: Integral on slide, rear notch and post front
Finish: Blued
Capacity: 6+1
MSRP: $349
Manufacturer: Ruger

Performance Data:

Winchester 95-gr. FMJ   
Best Group: 1.72 in.
Worst Group: 2.34 in.
Avg. Group: 2.01 in.

Winchester 85-gr. Train & Defend
Best Group: 1.02 in.
Worst Group: 1.94 in.
Avg. Group: 1.65 in.

Winchester 85-grain Kinetic HE
Best Group: 1.44 in.
Worst Group: 1.99 in.
Avg. Group: 1.88 in.

Accuracy data was the result of five, five-shot groups fired deliberately at a distance of 7 yards from a standing position.

 

Originally published by Gun Digest, April 13, 2017

Springfield Armory Introduces XD-E Pistol

By: Tamara Keel

Springfield Armory Introduces XD-E Pistol

Springfield Armory held an extremely secretive new product launch a few weeks ago at the Clark County range complex outside Las Vegas, NV, to showcase a gun that I can honestly say none of the attendees saw coming: The XD-E. It’s a subcompact single-stack, in the same size category as the Glock G43, Smith & Wesson Shield, or Springfield’s own XD-S, only with a difference.

Unlike those striker-fired guns, the XD-E is a traditional double-action/single-action hammer-fired pistol with ambidextrous thumb safeties that also function as decocking levers. Shipping with both flush-fit 8-round and extended 9-round magazines, the slim pistol gives the shooter a choice of carrying in cocked-and-locked single-action mode like a 1911-pattern pistol, or dropping the hammer before holstering and firing the first shot double-action. With the rise in popularity of AIWB carry, a slim single stack with a hammer that can be controlled with the thumb while holstering has a ready market niche.

At the launch, we had time to put rounds downrange, and no malfunctions were observed all weekend. The single-action trigger pull is good and breaks right at 5 pounds on the test gun we received, with a reasonable takeup. Double-action is heavy, at approximately 12 pounds, starting with a smooth, even takeup, but a pretty distinct “wall” right before the break.

MSRP is $519

FN America Introduces The FN 509

By: American Rifleman Staff


Want to see what came close—but what not selected as the U.S. Army’s new sidearm in its Modular Handgun System (MHS) competition? FN America’s entry was the FN 509 9 mm striker-fired pistol—and has now been refined and made available commercially to civilians and law enforcement. The pistol is the subject of an upcoming American Rifleman feature story.
“When the requirements for MHS were released, our team of engineers immediately went to work, taking the successful elements of the FNS Compact and further developing those to meet the needs of the U.S. Army’s solicitation for a new, full-size pistol,” said Mark Cherpes, president and CEO of FN America. “Between the submission of MHS and the commercial release of the FN 509, we have worked with law enforcement agencies throughout the U.S. and captured on-site feedback that we used to further optimize the pistol to far exceed the expectations of our valued customers.”
 

FN America Launches MHS Entry: The 509 9 mm Pistol

Built on the bones of the FNS Compact, FN made changes internally and externally to meet the rigorous performance standards of the MHS requirements and further developed the platform into the FN 509 with help from industry experts. Over the course of development, the platform has been put through the rigors of 1 million rounds of testing for reliability, ammunition compatibility and durability.

Aesthetic changes to the platform include more aggressive cocking serrations, enhanced grip textures, guarded controls and recessed target crown on the barrel. Critical internal components were completely redesigned to ensure maximum performance to meet FN’s demanding standards. The FN 509 is currently shipping to FN distributors in two commercial SKUs, available at retail in early May, and two law enforcement SKUs, available in early June. Other options like manual safety models will be made available at a future date.

The new pistol can be seen in person as early as April 28, 2017, at the FN Booth at the 2017 NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits in Atlanta, Ga. To read more on the design and development of the FN 509 or to find a dealer near you, please visit fnamerica.com.

Specifications
Model: FN 509
Caliber: 9 mm
Safety: Non-manual; internal, passive safeties
Sights: Fixed 3-dot luminescent sights; fixed 3-dot night sights (LE only)
Operation: Striker; DAO
Trigger Pull: 5.5 – 7.5 lbs.
Capacity: 10 or 17 rounds
Weight: 26.9 oz
Barrel Length: 4in
Twist Rate: 1:10″ RH
Overall Length: 7.4in

Switzerland’s B&T Introduces USW-A1 to U.S. Market

By: American Rifleman Staff

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The Swiss-designed-and-built Universal Service Weapon (USW), introduced in Europe in 2016 and previewed at SHOT Show 2017 to an enthusiastic audience, is now available to both law enforcement professionals and commercial customers in the United States. This 9 mm USW-A1 represents an entirely new category of firearms systems designed to fill the gap between submachine gun and 9 mm police carbine.

Manufactured by Brugger and Thomet (B&T), the USW-A1 was designed specifically to meet the needs of today’s law enforcement professionals, who often face challenges that far exceed the capabilities of many of today’s most sophisticated pistols, and who during specific conflict situations do not have the time to reach for their standard issue carbine rifle. Now first responders, in most cases patrol officers, can intervene in any sudden event with more stable rapid fire, greater accuracy, and longer range than a standard 9 mm semi-automatic pistol.

Taking advantage of an integral spring-loaded folding stock and custom Aimpoint Nano red dot sight, the user can deploy an extremely accurate pistol carbine in as little as 1.5 seconds from its own custom Level 3 polymer holster. The USW-A1 is capable of 1.6″ groups at a range of approximately 27 yards, or 40 mm groups at 25 meters. Adding to its stability is a fixed bridge mount for the Aimpoint, keeping the sight stationary during cycling of the gun. With the stock folded, the USW-A1 can function as a standard holstered sidearm.

The USW-A1 is available with 17, 19, and 30-round double stack magazines, and can easily be configured with B&T’s own Impuls-11A Suppressor.

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STI International Adds Suppressor-Ready HOST Pistol

by SI Staff

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STI International introduced its new optics and suppressor-ready HOST Pistol, which is designed for shooters looking to add suppressors, slide-mounted red-dot sights and other accessories to their handgun.

The new HOST Pistol features fixed suppressor sights with tritium illumination, allowing shooters to co-witness the iron sights with a variety of slide-mounted optics on the market. The taller suppressor sights also allow shooters to aim over larger suppressors mounted on the barrel. The barrels on all models of the HOST Pistol include a classic cut that allows for suppressor use without the need for an extended adapter.

For optic use, the new pistol comes with a milled slide and a cover plate, along with adapters that allow the HOST to use Leupold Delta Point Pro, Vortex Viper and Trijicon RMR optics. The gun also features a toughened black diamond-like coating designed to allow the pistol to withstand extreme environments and holster wear. Another aspect of the gun is an incorporated Picatinny rail in the frame, allowing users to mount lights, lasers and other accessories.

The HOST Pistol comes in a number of different configurations. Users can choose between the company’s single-stack 1911 design or the double-stack 2011 design. Other options include a choice of 4-inch or 5-inch barrel lengths and caliber choices are 9 mm, .45 ACP and 10 mm. The 10 mm model is only available with a 5-inch barrel.

The suggested retail price on the HOST 1911 Pistol is $2,599, while the HOST 2011 Pistol retails at a suggested price of $3,199.

 

Review: Colt Delta Elite 10 mm Pistol

By: Dick Williams

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When I’m interested in powering up a handgun, downsizing the caliber is not my first thought. Yet, that’s the premise behind the 10 mm cartridge as envisioned by the FBI during its pursuit of the perfect pistol cartridge/caliber during the final decade of the last century. The bureau’s on-again/off-again romance with different solutions (along with Dornaus & Dixon’s failure of its Bren 10 pistol to reach production) essentially doomed the 10 mm until Colt stepped in and provided a home for the cartridge in the company’s iconic Model 1911.

The Colt Delta Elite is a Series 80 (rather than the older Series 70) design. This means—in addition to other manual-safety devices like the grip safety and slide stop, automatic safety devices like the disconnector, the hammer safety stop and the inertia firing pin—the Delta Elite also has a firing-pin lock. This prevents the firing pin from moving forward until the trigger is pressed. Some gunwriters, usually older guys, tend to go emotionally berserk over this feature. Don’t; the firing-pin lock requires a couple of extra steps and pieces in manufacturing, but it works fine.

(l.) A memory bump on the lower portion of the beavertail aids in rapid deactivation. (r.) Though narrow, the thumb safety offers ample purchase.

While the Delta Elite is available in either stainless or blue steel, the test gun furnished was stainless and ran flawlessly on the range with all ammo tested. I can’t address the gun’s performance under adverse conditions simply because the gun didn’t really get dirty during our outings together. Good news is that it worked fine right out of the box, with no break-in period needed.

Things I liked: The controls are well designed. The prominent “speed bump” on the grip safety ensured proper disengagement with my normal shooting grip, while the large beavertail grip safety provided ample protection from slide cuts. A slender, strong-side thumb safety allowed easy manipulation, yet facilitated a proper firing grip (shooting hand thumb on top of rather than under the safety lever). Rubber grip panels with “checkering” resisted damage from scrapes and bumps but provided adequate grip control. Subdued serrations on the mainspring housing permitted a firm firing grip without snagging clothing during the draw stroke or while carrying concealed. Sharp-edged cuts on each side of the slide assisted manual operation of the pistol. An old-style barrel bushing and traditional recoil-spring guide simplified takedown, without requiring any additional tools. Both front and rear sights are dovetail-mounted in the slide, enhancing survivability in a rough environment. The three-white-dot sight system seems to be the norm for defensive pistols these days and does offer an improved sight picture in dim light or against threats wearing dark clothing.

Things that might be changed: There are no bumper pads on factory magazines, and while a flat bottom is fine on the magazine carried in the gun, speed reloads are greatly aided by an extended bumper pad. In fairness, the Delta Elite’s magazines did have rounded bottoms that protruded slightly below the magazine well, and that helped ensure proper seating with one definitive slap.

(l.) Holes in the trigger provide aesthetic appeal and beneficial weight reduction. (ctr.) The drift-adjustable rear sight is wedge-shaped to prevent snagging on cover garments. (r.) A single white dot adorns the Delta Elite’s dovetailed front blade and promotes a quick and intuitive sight picture.

Every edge on the Delta Elite’s slide was quite sharp and, with the exception of the aforementioned slide cuts, they could stand some rounding. While the dehorning process would add some manufacturing costs to the gun (and perhaps detract from the appearance of the precisely machined slides) I’m in favor of a slightly friendlier exterior.

Things I’d consider changing: Flying in the face of today’s tactical wisdom, I’d think about putting adjustable sights on the pistol. Yes, it was conceived as a fighting pistol, but it handles a wide range of bullet weights with velocities normally reserved for magnum-caliber handguns. With its noticeably flatter trajectories, one can make precision shots at ranges well beyond what’s considered acceptable for conventional carry pistols, but only if you have properly sighted the gun in for your selected load. No, I haven’t made any hostage-rescue shots, but I have been hog hunting with 1911s chambered in 10 mm, and it was nice knowing exactly where the bullet would impact at ranges beyond 50 yards.

It’s no secret that I’m a long-term fan of the 1911, and now I’ve become a fan of the 10 mm 1911. If you start with a pistol that fits you and you can run smoothly, then how can you not like the added performance enhancements offered by the 10 mm? If you can handle the recoil/power of the .45 ACP or .40 S&W you shouldn’t have any problem managing the 10 mm Colt Delta Elite.

Century Arms Introduces New AK Pistols

By: SI Staff

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Century Arms announced the addition of two new AK-47 pistol models to the company’s lineup: the C39V2 and the RAS47. Both models contain many of the same features found in the rifle variants, while the overall length has been trimmed down.

“This great addition to our AK line is the result of considerable development that has gone into our government-focused product line,” said Jason Karvois, Century Arms’ director of sales. “As we were developing our full-auto and short-barreled models for various contracts, the pistol variants were a logical offshoot for the commercial market. Plus, these things are just plain fun to shoot.”

Both guns feature a receiver side rail, which are compatible with the company’s AK Micro Dot Side Mount. The guns also feature 4150 nitride-treated barrel, RAK-1 enhanced trigger group and multiple quick-detach attachment points for sling mounting. The guns also sport Magpul MOE AK furniture, including a grip and a handguard.

The difference between the two guns is found in the design and construction of the receiver. The C39V2 AK pistol features a milled receiver made from 4140 ordnance-grade steel. The RAS47 AK pistol features a stamped-steel receiver.

The two AK pistols are completely made in the USA. The C39V2 retails at a suggested price of $909.99, while the RAS47 model retails at a suggested price of $749.99.