Ruger Precision Rifle Now in 5.56 NATO/.223 Rem.

By: American Rifleman Staff

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Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. has introduced the Ruger Precision Rifle chambered in 5.56 NATO/.223 Rem., usable with a wide range of readily available ammunition, and broadening the appeal of the already very popular rifle.
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The new Precision Rifle employs a hybrid “Target” chamber, which safely accommodates 5.56 NATO cartridges while providing excellent projectile control and accuracy for both .223 Rem and 5.56 NATO cartridges. The rifle ships with two Ruger AI-Style Precision Rifle magazines that accommodate 5.56 NATO and .223 Rem. factory ammunition loaded with the longer, higher ballistic coefficient projectiles popular among long-range shooters.

Like all Ruger Precision Rifles, this model’s highly accurate, free-floated barrel is cold hammer-forged from 4140 chrome-moly steel and features 5R rifling for minimum bullet upset. Minimum bore and groove dimensions (air-gauged for process control) and a centralized chamber deliver outstanding accuracy, longevity and ease of cleaning. This new model features a 1:7” twist rate that stabilizes long-for-caliber projectiles.

All models of the Ruger Precision Rifle are equipped with a left-folding stock with adjustable comb height and length of pull, an ergonomic pistol grip and a Precision Rifle handguard, all of which may be customized with AR-style components. The Ruger Precision Rifle also features a Ruger Precision Rifle Hybrid Muzzle Brake, a 20 MOA scope base and the Ruger Marksman Adjustable trigger, which provides a user-adjustable pull weight range between 2.25 and 5 pounds.

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Review: Glock G41 and G42

By: B. Gil Horman

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Since its inception in the early 1980s, Gaston Glock’s pistol has become firmly established as one of the premier polymer-frame, striker-fired handguns available in the marketplace. The simple, rugged and reliable semi-automatic pistols have been adopted by military, law enforcement, competition and self-defense practitioners all around the world. Last year, Glock expanded its product line with two new models that rest at opposite ends of its product size spectrum. For fans of the full-size, long-slide “practical/tactical” configuration, which has been available in 9 mm Luger and .40 S&W, Glock has introduced the G41 chambered in the popular and potent .45 ACP cartridge. Designed for convenient concealed carry, the new single-stack .380 ACP-chambered G42 represents the smallest pistol that the company has produced to date.

The Practical/Tactical Gen4 G41 .45 ACP
The G41 is a .45 ACP Safe-Action semi-automatic pistol with a full-size (Standard) Gen4 frame and an extended black gas-nitrite-finished slide. With more metal onboard from the extended slide and barrel, it makes sense that long-slide-configured pistols would weigh more than standard models. Glock has addressed this in the past—with its lengthy G34 (9 mm Luger) and G35 (.40 S&W)—by removing material via a rectangular lightening cut in the top of the slide, between the front sight and the chamber, resulting in overall weights more in line with the standard-length models.

Instead of following this pattern of stretch-and-cut slide design for the new G41, the company used a different approach. Weight was reduced by using a narrower, thinner-walled slide with external dimensions much like those of the G34, albeit a fraction of an inch longer. The result is an upper assembly with enough room for a 5.31″ extended octagonal-rifled barrel, no cut-out in the top of the slide, and an overall weight that’s 2.84 ozs. lighter than the standard-size G21.

The G41 sight system employs a factory-standard polymer white-dot front sight and a polymer white-bracket rear sight containing two adjustment screws for windage. The slide features an extractor with a square protrusion that acts as both a visual and tactile loaded-chamber indicator. The recoil assembly is of the Gen4 variety, with a polymer guide rod, dual recoil springs and steel supports.

The rest of the pistol, including the trigger, frame and magazines, is lifted directly from the Gen4 version of the G21 service-size .45 ACP pistol. The smooth-faced trigger of the pistol tested required 5 lbs., 6 ozs., of force to cycle, according to a Lyman digital trigger gauge. As a Safe-Action pistol, the G41 contains the same three independent passive safeties found in other Glock models: a trigger safety, firing pin safety and drop safety.

The two-pin frame houses the takedown lever, along with the slide lock and magazine release, which are located on the left side. The enlarged magazine release button is reversible for left-handed users. A full-size molded-in Picatinny compatible accessory rail can be used to support a wide variety of light and laser modules. The pistol has textured finger grooves along the frontstrap of the grip with the Gen4 Rough Texture Frame blunted pyramids surface treatment on the backstrap and sides.

The G41 arrives in a hard case with a total of three magazines holding 13 or 10 rounds, depending on local regulations. Four interchangeable backstraps, two with beavertail grip extensions and two without, and an installation tool are also included. With no backstrap installed, the frame presents the smallest grip size, which is a 0.08″ reduction in the distance to the trigger compared to the Gen3 frame. Adding one of the small (2 mm) backstraps brings the frame back to the original Gen3 size, while the installation of a larger backstrap (4 mm) adds an extra 0.08″ for shooters with bigger hands.

The most notable characteristic of the G41 at the shooting range is how light and well balanced it is for a long-slide .45 ACP. With a fully loaded 13-round magazine, it feels like the gun ends at the trigger guard. In other words, it points and handles like a short-barreled pistol instead of an extended one. The trigger cycled smoothly, and the pistol ran flawlessly with test ammunition ranging from steel-cased imports to defense-grade +P hollow points.

There is one advertising point for the G41 that did not play out in the course of testing. A press release from Glock states, “The longer barrel and slide on the G41 Gen4 helps to reduce muzzle flip and felt recoil … .” That might be true if the elongation of the G41’s upper assembly resulted in a proportional weight increase, but, as discussed, that is not the case.

With an empty magazine, the G41 tipped the scale at just 26.8 ozs. That means it actually weighs almost 3 ozs. less than a standard Gen4 G21. Since the G41 uses the same recoil assembly, and the bullets fired are gaining a little more velocity due to the 0.71″ longer barrel, the lighter slide will transmit more felt recoil, not less, to the operator’s hands. In actuality, the G41’s level of felt recoil was generally on par with the G21 but in some cases it exhibited more recoil and muzzle rise. The increase was negligible, but the G41 should not be thought of as a reduced-recoil .45.

When it came to accuracy testing, the G41 proved to be a top-notch performer for an out-of-the-box pistol. The 5.31″ barrel and extended sight radius kept the five-shot group averages below the 3″ mark at 25 yds.

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The Pocket-Size G42 .380 ACP
Shrinking an existing full-size handgun design into a pocket pistol platform is no mean feat of engineering. Many manufacturers don’t even try; rather, they often beg, borrow, or whip up a whole new design from scratch. It’s interesting to see how the features of the G42 were compressed, modified and, in some cases, left just the same as other Glock models.

Proofmarks on the slide, barrel and frame indicate that the G42 is made at Glock’s Smyrna, Ga., facility. Although it is not marketed as a Gen4 product, it takes many of its cues from the latest generation pistols. Using the same materials and processes employed in the construction of the full-size models, this little pistol is fitted with Glock’s proprietary Safe-Action trigger and internal safety systems. The G42 is 5.94″ long, 4.13″ high, and weighs 13.8 ozs. unloaded, making it the smallest Glock pistol to date. It is listed as being 0.94″ wide but it’s only this thick near the slide lock. The rest of the frame is no more than 0.89″ wide, and the slide is just 0.83″ wide. The 3.25″ barrel contains hexagonal rifling, which means it should not be fired with non-jacketed bullets.

The pistol exhibits a mix of unique and familiar features. The matte-black slide is topped with factory standard polymer white-dot front and white-bracket rear fixed sights. The slide lock, magazine release and takedown lever are in their expected locations and are actually the same size and shape as those found on the Gen4 pistols. However, the frame has only one pin instead of two.

The grip frame has a Gen1-style straight frontstrap, with the backstrap featuring the usual palm swell. All four sides of the grip are treated with a light version of the Rough Texture Frame grip treatment. The grip has a small, but distinctive, downward-curving beavertail to protect the shooter’s hand from the slide. The backstrap extends down below the mouth of the magazine well, nearly flush with the flat base of the drop-free, fully-metal-lined, six-round single-stack magazines. This extension makes the grip a little longer, a bit more rounded, and it protects the shooter’s palm from being abraded by the movement of the magazine base during recoil.

One notable change to the interior is an enlarged firing pin safety plunger with an irregular shape and a beveled surface. The recoil assembly is of the Gen4 variety with dual recoil springs, a polymer guide rod and steel supports in key locations.

One of the best choices the company made with the G42 was to retain the familiar trigger guard and trigger dimensions of its larger pistols. Although the trigger guard is narrower, its length, shape, finger rest and the size of its opening remain the same. The trigger itself is the same size and shape as the smooth-faced triggers used on the Gen4 pistols, with the same 0.49″ travel distance. As a result, the trigger feels perfectly familiar to those who already use Glock pistols.

Specifications for the pistol indicate that it’s supposed to leave the factory with a 5-lb., 8-oz. trigger. An early version of it required 7 lbs., 3 ozs. of trigger pull to cycle, which is heavy for a Glock. Another G42 manufactured later in the year had a better trigger, with a pull weight of 6 lbs., 8 ozs., which was still heavier than listed. The trigger was good, but not quite as good as it could be.

At the shooting range, the G42 proved to be a comfortable, soft-shooting pocket pistol. Diminutive .380s tend to produce moderate to intense levels of felt recoil, with some loads becoming uncomfortable to shoot after just a few rounds. The felt recoil produced by the G42 was mild with standard-pressure full-metal-jacket and defense-type ammunition. Only when it was loaded with the hottest ammunition in the test set did it start to produce a moderate level of recoil.

Throughout the entire test, the G42 did not experience any of the traditional ammunition failures that can occur with semi-automatic pistols, such as failures to feed or extract or stove-piped cases. The only two events that could be noted as malfunctions where when the pistol’s slide locked open when firing a high-velocity load. In both cases, the chamber was clear and the next round in the magazine chambered when the slide was retracted and allowed to fall forward. This is the first time I’ve had a semi-automatic pistol go into slide lock during a test fire. But since the G42 did not lock open with any other load, it seems that the increased pressure produced by this particular load was the source of the problem.

One of the reasons the double-stack Glock sub-compacts are popular is because they are capable of producing down-range accuracy on par with the Glock Compact and Standard size pistols. The G42 did not demonstrate the same level of accuracy as the double-stack models, which was not wholly unexpected. Instead, the accuracy was in line with other pistols of the same size and caliber, such as the Ruger LC380 and the Taurus PT638 PRO SA. With targets set at 7 yds., the G42 produced group averages ranging around 1.5″ to 2″ in size. This is a solid level of defensive accuracy for an easy-to-carry, close-range defensive tool, which is how the G42 is intended to be used.

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Final Thoughts
Some gun owners make the mistake of thinking that all Glock pistols are alike because they share the same color scheme and profile. In truth, the new G41 .45 ACP and the G42 .380 ACP represent Glock’s willingness to take risks and move its product line in new directions. As a hybrid pistol, blending the extended-slide design, the standard G21 frame, and Glock’s Gen4 package of features, the G41 successfully reflects the best that Glock has to offer. It’s a welcome addition for competition, on-duty use and home defense.

As for the G42, Glock was successful in shrinking its platform to satisfy a broad swath of the concealed-carry market. The Glocksters among us will feel right at home with the G42’s layout. It operates like a Glock, the trigger is the same as the double-stack pistols and it’s just as reliable as the larger models. For shooters who have not owned a Glock, the G42 is soft-shooting, easy to operate, and demonstrates a level of defensive accuracy as good (or better) as other pistols in its class. It’s an ideal concealed-carry option for new and seasoned shooters, alike.

Steyr AUG/A3 M1

By: American Rifleman Staff
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When first introduced in 1977, the Steyr AUG looked radically futuristic, and despite the intervening decades of firearm development, it still ranks highly among the guns most likely to appear in a science-fiction movie. At the time of its creation, the AUG’s bullpup design—a configuration placing the firearm’s action and magazine behind the trigger group in order to reduce overall length without sacrificing barrel length—was equally ahead of its time. And while the bullpup hasn’t exactly gone on to set the gun world on fire, several manufacturers have found reasonable success tinkering with and improving upon the formula—including Steyr itself.

Despite already being one of the most successful bullpups of all time, Steyr Mannlicher continues to make design improvements and upgrades to its AUG (or Armee Universal Gewher), including its newest iteration—the A3 M1—which offers shooters more sighting options than any of its predecessors.

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Making use of a modular optics attachment platform, the A3 M1 is available in Short-Rail, High-Rail and integrated-optic versions with either a 1.5X or 3X scope built into the carry handle. In addition, all three optics-mounting modules can be easily interchanged with one another.

The Short-Rail includes 11 numbered Picatinny rail slots for the mounting of optics. It ends at the back of the receiver and sits 0.435″ above the stock comb. The High-Rail extends an additional 2.57″ from the end of the receiver and offers 16 numbered slots at a height of 0.82″ above the comb.

Steyr’s integrated optic module, in addition to an integral Meopta riflescope, features a 15-slot rail along the top of the housing to accommodate a close-quarter reflex sight, and a four-slot section on the right side for the use of a light or laser. The scope’s axis rests 1.945″ above the stock comb, allowing for a solid cheekweld.

The A3 M1 is available in two stock varieties—the traditional version, which uses Steyr’s proprietary “waffle-style” polymer magazines, and the NATO version, which accepts the widely available STANAG magazines. The traditional configuration is available in black, tan and green, while the NATO version comes only in black.

Much of the rest of the A3 M1 remains unchanged from its previous incarnation, the AUG A3 SA. The guns are short-stroke, gas-piston operated with a two-position gas regulator—one for normal use and one allowing more gas flow for use when the rifle is dirty. The receivers are made from investment cast, Eloxal-coated aluminum, and the barrels are phosphated, chrome-lined steel. The AUG’s distinctive folding fore-grip is also still here, able to be used either perpendicular or parallel to the bore. The A3 M1 likewise retains the quick-change barrel capability of the A3 SA, allowing the barrel to be removed with the push of a button.

A non-reciprocating charging handle is located on the left side of the receiver, and doubles as a forward assist. The bolt can be locked back by retracting the charging handle and rotating it clockwise against a notch in the receiver. In order to then close the action, lightly slapping the handle out of the notch will cause the recoil spring to drive it forward. A five-slot Picatinny rail is situated on the right side of the receiver, opposite the charging handle.

The magazine release, located just behind the magazine well, is positioned for ambidextrous use. At 8 lbs., 15 ozs. with an empty magazine and the integral scope installed, the A3 M1 is not a light rifle, but the gun is balanced in such a way that it feels far lighter than that when shouldered.

The A3 M1 can be reconfigured for ejection from the left side by replacing the standard bolt with a left-hand unit and swapping the ejection port cover to the opposite side. While these changes make the bullpup usable by a southpaw, the position of the charging handle may still be awkward for some left-handed shooters.

The trigger is often the Achilles heel of many bullpup designs, owing to the long trigger bar required to link the fore-mounted trigger to the action behind it, but the gun we received for evaluation featured an exceptional trigger pull for a stock factory bullpup. Initial take up was scarcely perceptible, with the trigger breaking cleanly at 10 lbs., 4 ozs.—a little heavy perhaps, but not too bad.

American shooters have been clamoring for an integrated-optic version of the AUG available here for a long time, which is why we elected to conduct accuracy testing using the 3X integral scope.

Accuracy at 100 yds. was decent for a gun of this type using 3X magnification; however, we believe the rifle capable of even smaller groups with the use of a more powerful optic.

Initially we encountered a few feeding issues, but were quickly able to diagnose them as being magazine-related. Switching to another magazine eliminated the problems. All firing was conducted using the gas regulator’s “normal” setting.

The Steyr AUG’s appearance is polarizing, with some shooters finding its lines appealing, and others finding them appalling. But aesthetics aside, the A3 M1 is a solid—if unorthodox—performer, and a good option for those seeking a 5.56×45 mm NATO-chambered semi-automatic rifle but wanting an alternative to the hoi polloi of the otherwise AR-laden general-purpose rifle market.

Ruger Expands Mark IV and Ruger American Compact Pistol Lines

By: American Rifleman Staff

Ruger Expands Mark IV and Ruger American Compact Pistol Lines

Ruger has announced additions to its Mark IV and Ruger American lines of pistols. The additions to the Mark IV family bring the total number of Mark IV models up to nine, with more additions planned for later this year. Ruger expects to duplicate a dozen of the most popular Mark III pistols in the Mark IV line.

Like all pistols in the Mark IV family, the 22/45 Tactical and Competition models feature a simple, one-button takedown for quick and easy field-stripping, ambidextrous manual safety and a redesigned bolt stop for more ergonomic operation. The magazines drop free on release for faster reloads and a redesigned magazine disconnect safety prevents discharge when the magazine has been removed.

Internal improvements include changes to the hammer, sear, bolt and firing pin for smoother, more reliable feeding. The Mark IV is compatible with a variety of Mark III aftermarket accessories including sights, scope bases and holsters.

The Mark IV Competition features a cold hammer-forged, 6.88″ slab-sided bull barrel and hardwood laminate thumb rest competition grips. The grip frame is CNC machined from one solid piece of stainless steel. Fully adjustable target sights are mounted on the barreled receiver for permanent sight-to-barrel alignment. The all stainless steel model weighs in at 45.8 ozs. for maximum stability in bullseye competition.

The Mark IV 22/45 Tactical features the lightweight polymer grip frame with rubberized replaceable grip panels that simulate the classic feel and grip angle of the 1911. The barreled receiver features a 4.40″ barrel with a 1/2″-28 thread pattern, perfect for the addition of the Ruger Silent-SR sound suppressor or other muzzle accessory. The pistol has fully adjustable sights and factory-installed Picatinny rails on both the top and bottom of the upper receiver to allow mounting of sights, lights, lasers and other tactical accessories.

Introduced in a duty size in 2015, the Ruger American Pistol Compact in .45 Auto is now offered with an ambidextrous manual safety.

The Ruger American Pistol features a pre-tensioned striker system, which allows for a short takeup trigger with positive reset, and a modular wrap-around grip system that adjusts palm swell and trigger reach to fit a wide range of hand sizes.

This compact model with ambidextrous manual safety, chambered in .45 Auto, is 7.25″ long and 4.65″ high with a 3.75″ barrel and weighs in at 29 ozs. with an empty magazine. It ships with medium and large replaceable grip modules and two nickel-Teflon plated steel magazines (one 10-round extended magazine and one 7-round compact magazine). The Ruger American Pistol Compact shares all of the features of the duty size gun in a smaller, lighter, more concealable package.

Every Ruger American Pistol is built in the USA on a rigid, one-piece, precision-machined, black nitrided, stainless steel chassis with integral frame rails and fire control housing. Additional features include genuine Novak LoMount Carry three-dot sights, a stainless steel slide with non-reflective, black nitride finish, a one-piece, high-performance, glass-filled nylon grip frame and a mil-standard 1913 accessory rail.

 

SIG Sauer Announces MPX 9 mm Semi-automatic Carbine

By: American Rifleman Staff

 

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When SIG Sauer introduced the popular modular SIG MPX submachine gun in 2014, it hinted that a carbine model was in development. We’ve just gotten word that the long-awaited SIG MPX 9 mm semi-automatic carbine is being introduced at the 2016 SHOT Show

“For those who want the full feature set of the SIG MPX, but don’t want a short-barrel rifle or live in a state with restricted access, the SIG MPX Carbine is a great choice,” said John Brasseur, Director of Product Management for SIG Sauer, Inc. “Later, if the operator decides to SBR the carbine, it’s a simple change with a conversion kit.”

The carbine maintains all of the ergonomics of the SBR and pistol variants, but now with a 16″ hammer-forged barrel, along with a full-length aluminum KeyMod handguard which provides ample room for mounting lights, lasers and grips. Completely ambidextrous, the carbine is great for left- or right-handed operators with its dual-sided selector switch, magazine release, charging handle and bolt release. The three-position collapsing stock features integrated QD sling cups for fast and easy sling attachments.

The carbine operates from a fully-closed bolt, and the locking rotating bolt system offers enhanced reliability and safety in use. A short-stroke gas piston with auto-regulating gas valve allows the SIG MPX Carbine to run all weights and brands of 9 mm ammunition, from low-power training loads to +P duty ammo. No adjustments are needed to maintain rock-solid reliability.

Familiar AR-pattern controls and ergonomics reduce the training curve and are instinctive for anyone experienced with the AR system. A full-length picatinny rail allows for solid, consistent mounting of optics and targeting lasers. SIG Sauer folding iron sights come standard.

The SIG MPX Carbine is completely modular, and handguards and barrel lengths can be quickly changed over in the field. The barrel comes with the SIG three-prong flash hider.

Check back here starting Mon., Jan. 18 for complete SHOT Show coverage of these SIG Sauer firearms and more.

SIGM400 Predator
For predator and varmint hunters who prefer to hunt with a semi-automatic rifle, SIG Sauer has also announced that it has redesigned the SIGM400 Predator and added it to its long-gun catalog. The new Predator is based on the direct-impingement SIGM400 action, with enhancements optimized for hunters.

“Hunting with the modern sporting rifle had gone from fad to an accepted norm,” said John Brasseur, Director of Product Development for SIG Sauer, Inc. “With the SIGM400 Predator, hunters have an exceptional hunting rifle right out of the box, with no upgrades or additions needed.”

The 5.56 mm cal. rifle features a two-stage match trigger, a hammer-forged stainless-steel barrel (18” in 5.56 mm and 16” in .300 BLK), and top picatinny rail. Barrels are threaded for muzzle devices or sound suppressors. It also features a hard-coat anodized upper and lower receiver, six-position MILSTD telescoping stock, and five-round detachable magazine.

 

Tested: Springfield Armory EMP4 Concealed Carry Contour

By: B. Gil Horman

Tested: Springfield Armory EMP4 Concealed Carry Contour

Last year I had my first opportunity to spend some quality time at the range with one of Springfield Armory’s 1911-pattern EMP4 9 mm pistols. This series is set apart from the competition by the reduced dimensions of the grip frame. Springfield spent the time and money required to compress the traditional 1911 .45-ACP grip to fit the 9 mm cartridge, which is not as easy to do as one might think.

  

The combination of this shooting-hand-friendly grip configuration with the reduced recoil of 9 mm ammunition, lightweight aluminum frame, longer 4″ barrel and top-notch controls led me to say of the EMP4 that, “It is one of the most well-balanced defensive single-stack 1911 pistols I’ve had the pleasure of working with.” I’m not alone in this opinion because the EMP4 has been a popular model with critics and consumers alike.

Just when I thought the EMP4 had reached a pinnacle in 9 mm pistol design, Springfield has served up a new model with an intriguing twist, or should I say, curve. Also known as a bobtail grip, the mainspring housing and heel of this pistol’s grip frame have been rounded off. This makes the pistol easier to carry concealed because it eliminates the squared-off portion of the grip that tends to poke out or print through clothing. 

Depending on your hand size and personal preferences, a bobtailed grip can also feel more comfortable to shoot. Generally speaking, a bobtail grip is a custom feature that costs more because of the extra work needed to shape, polish and refinish the grip. Adding a bobtail to an existing pistol can cost upwards of $200. However, Springfield’s in-house contour for this pistol is a real value at half the price.

 

This version of the EMP4 two-tone, single-stack 1911 pistol retains the features that have kept this model selling like hot cakes. The satin finish stainless steel side has rear cocking serrations and a 3-dot sight system which employs a red fiber optic in front and a low profile white dot sight in back. The 4″ stainless steel, match-grade bushing-less bull barrel sports a fully supported ramp. The full-length one-piece steel guide rod supports a single round wire recoil spring.

The lightweight frame is forged aluminum with a traditional rounded trigger guard and matte-black hardcoat anodized finish. The controls, including the slide stop, round button magazine release, ambidextrous thumb safety, skeletonized hammer and extended beaver tail grip safety, are all steel with a matte black finish which matches the frame. The skeletonized trigger is aluminum with a matte silver finish to match the slide. The pistol ships with three blued steel 9-round, single-stack magazines.

 

Along with the bobtail contour, the other changes to this model of the EMP4 can be found in and around the grip frame. The frontstraps and backstraps are both treated with a more aggressive “golf ball” type texturing. The hardwood grips have been replaced with black G10 panels that have the same texture. The result is a grip that rests comfortably, but securely, in the hand. This new model exhibits the same degree of top-notch fit, finish and attention to detail as its predecessor. 

At the shooting range, the EMP performed to my fairly high expectations. The slide exhibited a tight fit to the frame, without any GI shake, and cycled smoothly right out of the box. The controls were easy to operate and functioned flawlessly. The clean, crisp single-action trigger pull was dead center of the listed pull weight (5 to 6 lbs.) at 5 lbs. 8 oz. The single-stack magazines locked tightly in place but easily dropped free when the magazine release was pressed.

How aggressive the texturing of a pistol’s grip should be depends on which school of thought you choose to follow. Over the last few years we’ve seen more of the highly aggressive tactical textured G10 grips favored by military and law enforcement making their way into the civilian market. These toothy patterns bite into skin or glove fabric to provide a secure purchase in wet or cold environments. Old-school grips have light textures to prevent wear and tear on clothing. The EMP4 Contour grip effectively splits the difference with leanings toward the tactical side while not being so abrasive as to need to replace your wardrobe on a regular basis. 

The pistol and magazines were utterly reliable without any hiccups or hang-ups throughout the entire course of testing using a full range of practice and premium grade ammunition. Because this is a concealed-carry pistol, benchrested accuracy testing was conducted at 25 yards by firing five 5-shot groups using premium defensive hollow-point ammunition.

The new 4″ barrel 9 mm EMP4 Concealed Carry Contour is another terrific example of how Springfield Armory is diligently working to tune this elegant century-old design to fit the needs of the modern concealed-carry practitioner. It’s true that polymer single-stack 9 mms can weigh and cost less than this gun. However, they just don’t have the same feel, light trigger pull, and accuracy potential right out of the box that this pistol provides. The new bobtail grip makes a very well balanced pistol just that much easier to carry.

NRA Specifications
Manufacturer: Springfield Armory
Model: EMP 4″ Concealed Carry Contour (PI9229L)
Action: Single-Action Semi-Automatic 1911
Caliber: 9 mm
Slide: Stainless Steel
Frame: Forged Aluminum, Black Hardcoat Anodized
Grip Panels: Black Textured G-10
Front Sight: Fiber Optic
Rear Sight: White Dot Low Profile Combat
Barrel: Stainless Steel Match Grade Bull, Fully Supported Ramp
Guide Rod: Full Length, Dual Recoil Springs
Trigger: Match Grade Long Aluminum
Barrel Length: 4.00″
Overall Length: 7.50″
Height: 5.50″
Slide Width: 0.92″
Grip Width: 1.15″
Weight: 31 oz. with Empty Magazine
Capacity: 9+1 Rounds
Twist: 1:16” LH
Rifle Grooves: 6
Accessories: Lockable Carry Case, Three 9-Round Blued Steel Magazines, Cable Lock, Owner’s Manual.

NRA-ILA Backs Constitutional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Bill

by American Rifleman Staff

NRA-ILA Backs Constitutional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Bill

The National Rifle Association’s Institute for Legislative Action (NRA-ILA) announced on Monday that on behalf of its 5 million members, it backs the introduction of S. 446, The Constitutional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017, sponsored by Senator John Cornyn (TX).

The full text of the press release is here:

Fairfax, Va.— On behalf of its five-million members, the National Rifle Association’s Institute for Legislative Action (NRA-ILA) today applauded the introduction of S. 446, The Constitutional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017, sponsored by Senator John Cornyn (TX).

“The current patchwork of state and local gun laws is confusing and can cause the most conscientious and law-abiding gun owner to run afoul of the law when they are traveling or temporarily living away from home,” said Chris W. Cox, executive director of the NRA-ILA. “Senator Cornyn’s legislation provides a much needed solution to a real problem for law-abiding gun owners.”

S446 would eliminate the confusing patchwork of state carry laws by allowing individuals who possess concealed carry permits from their home state or who are not prohibited from carrying concealed in their home state to exercise those rights in any other state that does not prohibit concealed carry.

This legislation would not override state laws governing the time, place or manner of carriage or establish national standards for concealed carry. Individual state gun laws would still be respected. If under federal law a person is prohibited from carrying a firearm, they will continue to be prohibited from doing so under this bill.

“Law-abiding citizens should be able to exercise their fundamental right to self-defense while traveling across state lines,” continued Cox. “We thank Senator Cornyn for his leadership on this important issue.” 

Concealed Carry Facts:

  • Every state in our nation recognizes the right of residents to lawfully carry a concealed handgun in public for self-defense – a right that more than 15 million Americans now exercise.
  • America’s experience with concealed carry demonstrates that the repeated anti-gun claim that concealed carry increases violence is factually incorrect. The available evidence shows that concealed carry licensees are exceptionally law- abiding. 
  • National reciprocity is already a reality in the 22 states that recognize all other concealed carry licenses or allow law-abiding non-residents to carry a firearm without a license.                                                                                                                                                                   
  • Only ten states still refuse to grant full faith and credit to the permits of other states, forcing lawful concealed carriers to surrender their rights when traveling through these jurisdictions. The consequence is obvious, as otherwise law-abiding citizens – including veterans, a single mother, a disaster response worker, a nurse and medical school student, and even a corrections officer – have become accidental criminals and suffered seizure of property, arrest, detention, and even prosecution because they failed to navigate the legal minefield that is the current state reciprocity system.

The bill recognizes the diversity of state concealed carry laws by making each person subject to the concealed carry laws of the state where they are present, including certain places off-limits to firearms and laws governing the defensive use of force. It merely allows out-of-state permittees to concealed carry the same way in-state residents already do.

As Congress considers the Constitutional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, gun control groups and their media allies will continue their disinformation assault on the bill. Armed with the truth, you can contact your member of Congress to set the record straight and urge them to support S. 446. You can also contact your member of Congress via the Congressional switchboard at (202) 224-3121.

To stay up to date on this issue and others, visit nraila.org.

 

Beretta Introduces the APX

By: American Rifleman Staff

Beretta Introduces the APX

After nearly five years of development, Beretta is finally bringing its APX pistol to the civilian market. The semi-automatic marks something of a departure for the company, as it stands as the first full-size striker-fired pistol in the venerable Italian firm’s nearly 500-year history.

Beretta’s entrant into the U.S. Army’s recently concluded XM17 Modular Handgun System (MHS) program, the APX was designed for duty use by military and law enforcement operators, however, the handgun will fit right in on the commercial home-defense market. American Rifleman’s Kelly Young had the opportunity to put the APX through its paces last week at The O’Gara Group’s tactical training facilities in Montross, Va. 

A polymer-frame pistol standing 7.56” long and 5.6” tall with a 4.25” barrel, the APX weighs 27 ozs. with an empty magazine. Utilizing a tilt-barrel, locked breech operating system, the new gun is chambered in 9 mm Luger and .40 S&W, with standard magazine capacities of 17 and 15 rounds, respectively. Bilateral slide locks and a reversible magazine-release button mean the APX can quickly be converted for left-handed use, and a replaceable backstrap system offers three different grip-circumference options. Sights on the gun follow the modern three-dot pattern.

Similar to the SIG P250 and P320, the APX utilizes a removable chassis (which for paperwork purposes is considered the serialized part) that allows the heart of the gun to be easily transferred into alternate frames—and Beretta is offering black, gray, Flat Dark Earth and Olive Drab Green frames for this purpose. The APX’s fiberglass-reinforced polymer frames also have a three-slot MIL-STD 1913 Picatinny rail segment molded into its dustcover.

In addition to a trigger safety and a firing pin block safety, the APX also features a striker deactivation button. Located near the beavertail on either side of the frame, this button allows the pistol to be field-stripped without pulling the trigger.